Cuttings From Mountain Laurel Shrubs: How To Root Mountain Laurel Cuttings


By: Teo Spengler

Mountain laurels are easy-maintenance plants native to this country. They grow happily in the wild, reproducing from seeds. Seeds won’t reliably reproduce hybrid cultivars. The only way to be sure of clones is mountain laurel cutting propagation. Growing cuttings from mountain laurel is possible, but it’s not always easy.

Mountain Laurel Cutting Propagation

When you want to grow mountain laurel from cuttings, the first step is to take the cuttings at the right time of year. Experts agree that cuttings from mountain laurel must be taken from the current year’s growth.

When exactly should you start your mountain laurel cutting propagation? You can take cuttings as soon as the growth ripens. Depending on which part of the world you call home, this could be early in the calendar year, or in the period August to December.

To successfully root mountain laurel cuttings, you’ll do well to take them from healthy branch tips. Make sure they haven’t been damaged by insects or disease. Each cutting should be 6 to 8 inches (15 to 20 cm.) long.

Rooting Mountain Laurel from Cuttings

The next step is to prepare the cuttings. Slice the base of each on both sides of the stem, then dip the bases in rooting hormone. Plant each in a small container in an equal mix of perlite, coarse sand and peat moss.

In order to root mountain laurel cuttings, you’ll need to keep them moist. Add water to the potting material when you plant them and mist the leaves. It helps hold the moisture in the cuttings from mountain laurel if you cover them with clear plastic bags, removing them only when you water and mist every day.

Patience Pays

When you are trying to grow mountain laurel from cuttings, the next step is patience. Keep the cuttings in a warm spot out of direct sunlight and keep the soil moist. Then prepare yourself for a wait. It may take four to six months before the cuttings root.

You’ll be able to tell if you gently lift up on the cuttings and feel resistance. These are the roots that are spreading in the soil. Don’t pull too hard because you don’t want to remove the plant yet, but you can stop sheltering it with a plastic bag. Give it another month, then transplant the cuttings.

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Read more about Mountain Laurel


How to Grow Mountain Laurel

Mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia) is flowering broadleaf evergreen shrub with a gnarly, multi-stemmed growth habit. It has beautiful spring blooms, and its elliptical, glossy deep-green leaves (resembling those of rhododendrons) and gnarled stems make it attractive in all seasons. This shade-loving shrub produces clusters of rose, pink, or white flowers with purple markings in late May to early June. If the flowers are not deadheaded, nondescript brown fruits will appear. Many different cultivars are available that offer various sizes and bloom colors.

Mountain laurel usually grows as a dense, rounded shrub, with branches that grow gnarlier as the shrub ages. It is a relatively slow-growing shrub, adding about one foot per year. While mountain laurel is particular about its soil needs, this plant is easy to grow in the right environment. It is a good flowering shrub for mass plantings in shady shrub borders, woodland gardens, or for foundation plantings. It partners well with rhododendrons and azaleas.

Mountain laurel is generally planted from spring (after frost danger has passed) to summer, from potted nursery plants. It has a moderately slow growth rate, adding 1 to 2 feet a year.

Botanical Name Kalmia latifolia
Common Names Mountain laurel, ivy bush, spoonwood, calico bush, American laurel
Plant Type Broadleaf evergreen shrub
Mature Size 5–15 feet in height, similar spread
Sun Exposure Prefers part shade, but can tolerate full sun
Soil Type Thrives in cool, rich, acidic soil that is moist but well-drained does not do well in clay
Soil pH 5–5.5 (acidic)
Bloom Time Late spring
Flower Color Rose, pink, white blooms may have purple markings
Hardiness Zones 4–9 (USDA)
Native Area Woodlands of eastern North America (New England south to southern Indiana, Louisiana, and the Florida panhandle)
Toxicity All parts highly toxic to animals and humans

How to Grow and Care for Mountain Laurel

Mountain laurel is easy to grow from transplants. While many plants that you might run across in the wild will not transplant well, young mountain laurels are highly adaptable. Most of us will probably not find one in the wild though, so we’ll have to hunt for our mountain laurel at our local nurseries. Mountain laurel tends to sell out early in the season, so plan ahead and beat the crowd. Select a variety that will work well in your region.

Mountain laurel is a sun-loving plant. It will especially appreciate several hours of morning sun and a partially sunny afternoon. If you can plant your shrub where this preference can be met, you will be rewarded with bountiful blossoms.

Once you have selected a sunny site to plant your mountain laurel in, treat it to acidic, well-drained soil. To add acid to your soil before planting, mix peat moss into your soil. Every spring before your mountain laurel blooms, add an acidic fertilizer into the soil in the form of peat moss, compost, or acidic mulches, like shredded bark or pine needles. The mulch will serve dual purposes: it will nourish your plant with the acid it loves and it will maintain soil moisture.

Mountain laurel needs to be watered regularly. The soil can feel moist to the touch at all times, but it will be happy if left a bit dry, too. It would rather be dry than waterlogged.

While pruning isn’t a must do, you can prune your mountain laurel to maintain its shape and to encourage flowering for the next season. Timing is everything when pruning this bush, so prune as the flower buds begin to fade away. If the buds are starting to drop themselves, it is too late to prune. You don’t want to make the mistake of pruning off the growth buds for next year.


My mountain laurel shrubs have developed brown spots on the leaves. These appeared almost overnight after some recent heavy rains. No sign of insects or mold. Any suggestions? Thanks in advance for your help.

Various leaf spot fungi cause yellow, brown or black dead blotches on mountain laurel leaves. These blotches frequently run together, causing heavily infected leaves to turn yellow or brown and fall prematurely. Cool, moist weather encourages these diseases, especially when new leaves are developing. Shake out all fallen and diseased leaves from the center of each laurel shrub and destroy them. Remove all dead branches in the center of individual plants or hedges to allow better aeration. Mulching helps prevent the disease from splashing up from the ground and infecting plants. Spray at weekly to 10-day intervals with sulfur or copper fungicide, particularly in rainy weather. Dig up and discard seriously infected shrubs together with the root system and soil ball.


Propagation of Un-Rooted Qty-28 Cuttings From Flowering Mountain Laurel Shrubs 6" to 8" inches long

Материалы: Un Rooted Qty 28 Cuttings, Mountain Laurel Shrubs, 6 to 8 inches long, for propagation methods

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Propagation of Un-Rooted Qty-28 Cuttings From Mountain Laurel Shrubs 6" to 8" inches long
Propagation of Un-Rooted Cuttings From Flowering Mountain Laurel Shrubs
How To Root Mountain Laurel un-rooted Cuttings
Mountain Laurels are easy-maintenance plants native to this country. They grow happily in the wild, reproducing from seeds. Seeds won’t reliably reproduce hybrid cultivars. The only way to be sure of clones is mountain laurel cutting propagation. Growing unrooted cuttings from mountain laurel is possible, but it’s not always easy.
Mountain Laurel Cutting Propagation
When you want to grow mountain laurel from unrooted cuttings, the first step is to take the unrooted cuttings at the right time of year. Experts agree that unrooted cuttings from mountain laurel must be taken from the current year’s growth.
When exactly should you start your mountain laurel cutting propagation? You can take unrooted cuttings as soon as the growth ripens. This could be early in the calendar year, or in the period August to December.
To successfully root mountain laurel unrooted cuttings, you’ll do well to take them from healthy branch tips. Make sure they haven’t been damaged by insects or disease. Each unrooted cutting should be 6 to 8 inches long.
Rooting Mountain Laurel from Cuttings
The next step is to prepare the unrooted cuttings. Slice the base of each on both sides of the stem, then dip the bases in a rooting hormone … Plant each in a small container in an equal mix of perlite, coarse sand and peat moss.
In order to root mountain laurel unrooted cuttings, you’ll need to keep them moist. Add water to the potting material when you plant them and mist the leaves. It helps hold the moisture in the unrooted cuttings from mountain laurel if you cover them with clear plastic bags, removing them only when you water and mist every day.
When you are trying to grow mountain laurel from cuttings, the next step is patience. Keep the unrooted cuttings in a warm spot out of direct sunlight and keep the soil moist. Then prepare yourself for a wait. It may take four to six months before the cuttings root.
You’ll be able to tell if you gently lift up on the unrooted cuttings and feel resistance. These are the roots that are spreading in the soil. Don’t pull too hard because you don’t want to remove the plant yet, but you can stop sheltering it with a plastic bag. Give it another month, then transplant the cuttings.

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Watch the video: Texas mountain laurel propagation


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